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Sunday, April 11, 2010

Steve's Church-less Movie Of The Week, Part 2 ...



Yoinked from wikipedia, movierapture.com and 1000misspenthours ...


"They Came From Beyond Space is a 1967 British science fiction film directed by Freddie Francis and written by Milton Subotsky. The plot revolves around several meteors that fall in a field in England. Those who approach them are seamingly taken over, and barracade the area from intruders. A scientist is immune to the takeover due to a metal plate in his head. He enlists the assistance of a friend, who must meltdown his silver cricket trophys to make a helmet to protect him.


The movie is based on the book The Gods Hate Kansas by Joseph Millard.




Freddie Francis' They Came from Beyond Space is a bad film. Unfortunately, it is not so bad that it is entertaining. Other than such embarrassments as the plastic crystals used by the aliens to take over the minds of their human victims and the flashlights they use as guns, the special effects are not as dreadful as are some that can be found in a number of other similar low budget movies. The script has its moments of camp badness as well, but it is generally just tedious and uninspired. The acting is frequently substandard, but it is decent just as often.


The film LOOKS pretty amazing, though. In They Came from Beyond Space, Francis achieves a vivid, proto-psychedelic look that meshes very well with the rollicking, jazzy score and the less-straitlaced-than-they-seem characters, simply by continuing to do what he’d been doing since his days as Hammer’s top cameraman. Whether by finding a few candy-colored pockets of ersatz snazz in the desperately cheap futuristic sets, or by playing up the scenic beauty of the Cornish countryside— or hell, even by lingering in exactly the right way upon the charming visage of Luanshya Greer’s spirited female gas-station attendant— Francis makes sure our eyes never get bored, even when our brains are thinking they’ve heard this all before."


1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Great double feature, Rev!