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Monday, December 27, 2010

Steve's Church-Less Movie Of The Week: Special Day Of Movies, Part 2 ...

So today my kids and I have watched the atmospheric but laughable Man from Planet X, then the kids and I re-watched the amazing Abbot and Costello meet Frankenstein. Now comes another B-movie classic.


Enjoy ...




Yoinked from the almighty wikipedia ...


"The Little Shop of Horrors is a 1960 American comedy film directed by Roger Corman. Written by Charles B. Griffith, the film is a farce about an inadequate young florist's assistant who cultivates a plant that feeds on human flesh and blood. The film's concept is thought to be based on a 1932 story called Green Thoughts by John Collier, about a man-eating plant.


The film stars Jonathan Haze, Jackie Joseph, Mel Welles and Dick Miller, all of whom had worked for Corman on previous films. Produced under the title The Passionate People Eater, the film employs an original style of humor, combining black comedy with farce and incorporating Jewish humor and elements of spoof. The Little Shop of Horrors was shot in two days utilizing sets that had been left standing from a previous production on a budget of $30,000.




The film slowly gained a cult following through word of mouth when it was distributed as the b movie in a double feature with Mario Bava's Black Sunday and eventually with The Last Woman on Earth. The film's popularity increased with local television broadcasts, in addition to the presence of a young Jack Nicholson, whose small role in the film has been prominently promoted on home video releases of the film.


The movie was eventually the basis for an off-Broadway musical, Little Shop of Horrors, which was made into a 1986 feature film and enjoyed a successful Broadway revival, all of which have attracted attention back to the original 1960 film.


But Steve likes A Bucket of Blood A WHOOOOOLE LOT BETTER!




The film was partially cast with stock actors that Corman had used in previous films. Writer Charles B. Griffith portrays several small roles. Griffith's father appeared as a dental patient, and his grandmother, Myrtle Vail appeared as Seymour's hypochondriac mother. Dick Miller, who had starred as the protagonist of A Bucket of Blood was offered the role of Seymour, but turned it down, instead taking the smaller role of Burson Fouch. The cast rehearsed for three weeks before filming began. Principal photography of The Little Shop of Horrors was shot in two days and one night.


It had been rumored that the film's shooting schedule was based on a bet that Corman could not complete a film within that time. However, this claim has been denied. According to Joseph, Corman shot the film quickly in order to beat changing industry rules that would have prevented producers from buying out an actor's performance in perpetuity. On January 1, 1960, new rules were to go into effect requiring producers to pay all actors residuals for all future releases of their work. This meant that Corman's B-movie business model would be permanently changed and he would not be able to produce low-budget movies in the same way. Before these rules went into effect, Corman decided to shoot one last film and scheduled it to happen the last week in December 1959.




Corman had initial trouble finding distribution for the film, as some distributors, including American International Pictures, felt that the film would be interpreted as anti-Semitic, citing the characters of Gravis Mushnick and Siddie Shiva. Welles, who is Jewish, stated that he gave his character a Turkish Jewish accent and mannerisms, and that he saw the humor of the film as playful, and felt there was no intent to defame any ethnic group. The film was finally released by Corman's own production company, The Filmgroup Inc., one year after it had been completed.


The film was screened out of competition at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival. However, because Corman did not believe that The Little Shop of Horrors had much financial prospect after its initial theatrical run, he did not bother to copyright it, resulting in the film falling into the public domain. Because of this, the film is widely available in copies of varying quality.


Jack Nicholson, recounting the reaction to a screening of the film, states that the audience 'laughed so hard I could barely hear the dialogue. I didn't quite register it right. It was as if I had forgotten it was a comedy since the shoot. I got all embarrassed because I'd never really had such a positive response before.' The film's popularity slowly grew with local television broadcasts throughout the 1960s and 1970s."


Steve's Snacks Of The Week:



Coffee

Pills

Red Apples

Popcorn

Mini Marshmallows

My Wife's Boobs




... AND NOW, Steve and this blog are both PROUD to once again present today's Church-less Movie of the Week in its entirety FOR FREE! Please, though, a few rules first. There's absolutely no talking in Steve's Theater and talkers WILL be raped ... although RAPE IS NOT A JOKE!


Anyways, no cell phones or African-American berries in the theater. No open flames. Dispose of all trash in its proper receptacle. And absolutely NO TEXTING! I am so serious about that last one.


And be sure to dim your headlights (where applicable).


ENJOY THE SHOW, Y'ALL!



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