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Sunday, September 30, 2012

Steve's Church-less Movie Of The Week ...

Yoinked from the almighty wikipedia god ...

"House of 1000 Corpses is a 2003 American exploitation horror film written and directed by Rob Zombie, and starring Sid Haig, Bill Moseley, Sheri Moon Zombie, Karen Black, Rainn Wilson and Erin Daniels. The plot focuses on two couples who are held hostage by a sadistic backwoods family on Halloween. Zombie's directorial debut, the film is heavily inspired by the horror and exploitation cinema of the 1970s, in the fashion of films such as The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) and The Hills Have Eyes (1977).

Filmed in 2000, the movie was originally bought by Universal Pictures, and a large portion of it was filmed on the Universal Studios backlots, but it was ultimately shelved by the company in fear that it would receive an NC-17 rating. The rights to the film were eventually re-purchased by Zombie, who then sold the film to Lions Gate Entertainment. It was released theatrically on April 11, 2003.

The names of the villains were taken from the names of Groucho Marx characters (Animal Crackers' 'Captain Spaulding', A Night at the Opera's 'Otis B. Driftwood', Duck Soup's 'Rufus T. Firefly', and A Day at the Races' 'Hugo Z. Hackenbush', among others). While this was left as a subtle allusion in the first movie, the sequel The Devil's Rejects brought it out into the open, with the names becoming integral to the plot. Dr. Satan was inspired by a 1950s billboard-sized poster advertising a 'live spook show starring a magician called Dr. Satan' that Zombie has in his house.

The film was completed in 2000; Stacey Snider, who was head of Universal at the time called Zombie up for a meeting. Zombie feared Snider would give him money and say 'go re-shoot everything'. Snider feared the film would receive an NC-17 rating, which led to the company refusing to release the film. After several years of the film being shelved, Zombie was able to purchase the film rights back from Universal, and sell them to Lions Gate Entertainment.

The starting budget was $3–4 million, but finished at $7 million. The film opened on April 11, 2003 without being pre-screened for critics. Those who viewed it gave it generally negative reviews. The film grossed $3,460,666 on its limited opening weekend and $2,522,026 on its official opening weekend. The film grossed $12,634,962 domestically and $4,194,583 in foreign totals. Altogether the film made a worldwide gross of $16,829,545.

Zombie produced a sequel in 2005, The Devil's Rejects. Sid Haig, Bill Moseley, Sheri Moon Zombie, and Matthew McGrory reprised their roles from Corpses. Karen Black demanded a higher salary — which Zombie could not afford — to return as Mother Firefly; Leslie Easterbrook was approached and later cast as her replacement. Tyler Mane - who would later play Michael Myers in Zombie's Halloween and Halloween II - took over the role of RJ. The character of Grampa Hugo was removed entirely as Dennis Fimple died before Corpses' release. The sequel received mixed reviews, but the critical reception was generally better than its predecessor."

Steve's Snacks Of The Week: Coffee
Pills
A Lot More Coffee
Asthma Medication
A Ton Of Popcorn
Random Chips
Internet Porn
Sexual Frustration

... AND NOW, Steve and this blog are both PROUD to once again present today's Church-less Movie of the Week in its entirety FOR FREE! But before the show starts lets go over a few theater rules.

First off, there's no talking in Steve's Theater during our feature presentation and talkers WILL be turned into Koran-loving socialist gays.

Also, no cell phones or African-American berries in the theater. No open flames. Dispose of all trash in its proper receptacle. And please ... NO TEXTING! Very serious about that.


And be sure to dim your headlights (where applicable).


ENJOY THE SHOW, Y'ALL!


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