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Saturday, October 27, 2012

Steve's Church-less Movie Of The Week: Kick Ass Double Feature Time ...

I am posting a kick ass double feature today. It's been a while since we've had one of those.

The first feature is a bona fide classic. The second feature is one of my favorites and, no joke, literally features ME, Reverend Steve Galindo!

So enjoy ...

Yoinked from the almighty wikipedia goddess ...

"The Mummy is a 1932 horror film from Universal Studios directed by Karl Freund and starring Boris Karloff as a revived ancient Egyptian priest. The movie also features Zita Johann, David Manners and Edward Van Sloan. It was shot in Cantil, California, Universal City, and the Mojave Desert.

In the film, an Ancient Egyptian priest called Imhotep (Boris Karloff) is revived when an archaeological expedition led by Sir Joseph Whemple (Arthur Byron) finds Imhotep's mummy. Imhotep escapes from the archaeologists, taking the Scroll of Thoth, and prowls Cairo seeking the reincarnation of the soul of his ancient lover, Princess Ankh-es-en-amon.

Karl Freund, the cinematographer on Dracula, was hired to direct two days before filming. The film was retitled The Mummy. He cast Zita Johann, who believed in reincarnation. Filming was scheduled for three weeks. Karloff's first day was spent shooting the Mummy's awakening from his sarcophagus. Make-up artist Jack Pierce had studied photos of Seti I's mummy to design Imhotep, though perhaps notably, Karloff looked nothing like the mummy of Seti I in the film, instead bearing a resemblance to the mummy of Ramesses III. Pierce began transforming Karloff at 11:00 am, applying cotton, collodion and spirit gum to his face; clay to his hair; and wrapping him in linen bandages treated with acid and burnt in an oven, finishing the job at 7:00 pm. Karloff finished his scenes at 2:00 am, and another two hours were spent removing the make-up.

A lengthy and detailed flashback sequence was filmed but ultimately cut out of the film. This sequence showed the various forms Anck-es-en-Amon was reincarnated in over the centuries. Stills exist of the flashbacks, but complete footage has yet to be found. It was shot in Cantil, California, Universal City, and the Mojave Desert. The piece of classical music heard during the opening credits, taken from the Tchaikovsky ballet Swan Lake, was previously also used for the opening credits of Dracula."

... AND NOW, Reverend Steve and this blog are both PROUD to once again present today's first Church-less Movie of the Week absolutely FREE! But first lets go over a few theater rules first.

Absolutely no talking is allowed during the feature presentation. Any and all talkers will be shat upon with extreme prejudice. No cell phones or African-American berries going off in the theater. And NO TEXTING!

And be sure to dim your headlights (where applicable).

ENJOY THE SHOW, Y'ALL!







And Now, Our Feature Presentation ...


I know I've shown this film here before.

But this is the Mr. Lobo version, Lobo being my all time favorite late night horror movie host.

Not only that but I (!!!) actually appear in this episode (!!!) as a coffee shop patron!

Enjoy ...

"A Bucket of Blood is a 1959 American comedy horror film directed by Roger Corman. It starred Dick Miller and was set in beatnik culture. The film, produced on a $50,000 budget, was shot in five days, and shares many of the low-budget filmmaking aesthetics commonly associated with Corman's work. Written by Charles B. Griffith, the film is a dark comic satire about a socially awkward young busboy at a Bohemian café who is acclaimed as a brilliant sculptor when he accidentally kills his landlady's cat and covers its body in clay to hide the evidence. When he is pressured to create similar work, he becomes murderous.

A Bucket of Blood was the first of three collaborations between Corman and Griffith in the comedy genre, followed by The Little Shop of Horrors, which was shot on the same sets as A Bucket of Blood, and Creature from the Haunted Sea. Corman had made no previous attempt at the genre, although past and future Corman productions in other genres incorporated comedic elements. The film is a satire not only of Corman's own films, but also of the art world and teen films of the 1950s. The film is noted as well in many circles as an honest, undiscriminating portrayal of the many facets of Beatnik culture, including art, dance and style of living."

Steve's Snacks Of The Week:

Much Coffies
A Bunch Of Pills
Cold Ice Cold Water
Root Beer
Various Pills
Tortilla Chips
Buttered Popped Corn
Whatever Candies I Can Find
My Wife's Boobs

Much Internet Porns

... AND NOW, Reverend Steve and this blog are both PROUD to once again present today's Church-less Movie of the Week absolutely FREE! Because I'm awesome is why. But first, kiddies, lets all go over a few theater rules first.

Absolutely no talking is allowed during the feature presentation. Any and all talkers will be slapped with extreme prejudice. No cell phones or African-American berries going off in the theater. And NO TEXTING!

And be sure to dim your headlights (where applicable).

ENJOY THE SHOW, Y'ALL!

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