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Friday, May 17, 2013

Steve's Church-less Movie Of The Week ...

Yoinked from the almighty wikipedia machine of knowledge ...



"Things to Come (1936) is a British science fiction film produced by Alexander Korda and directed by William Cameron Menzies. The screenplay was written by H. G. Wells and is a loose adaptation of his own 1933 novel The Shape of Things to Come and his 1931 non-fiction work, The Work, Wealth and Happiness of Mankind. The film stars Raymond Massey, Ralph Richardson, Cedric Hardwicke, Pearl Argyle and Margaretta Scott.

The cultural historian Christopher Frayling calls Things to Come 'a landmark in cinematic design.'

Wells is assumed to have had a degree of control over the project that was unprecedented for a screenwriter, and personally supervised nearly every aspect of the film. Posters and the main title bill the film as 'H. G. Wells' THINGS TO COME', with 'an Alexander Korda production' appearing in smaller type. In fact, Wells ultimately had no control over the finished product, with the result that many scenes, although shot, were either truncated or not included in the finished film. The rough-cut reputedly ran to 130 minutes; the version submitted to the British Board of Film Censors was 117m 13s; it was released as 108m 40s (later cut to 98m 06s) in the UK, and 96m 24s in the United States (see below for later versions). Wells's script and selected production notes were published in book form in 1935, and was reprinted in 1940 and 1975.

Wells originally wanted the music to be recorded in advance, and have the film constructed around the music, but this was considered too radical and so the score, by Arthur Bliss, was fitted to the film afterwards in a more conventional way. A concert suite drawn from the film has remained popular; as of 2003, there are about half-a-dozen recordings of it in print. After filming had already begun, the Hungarian abstract artist László Moholy-Nagy was commissioned to produce some of the effects sequences for re-building of Everytown. Moholy-Nagy's approach was partly to treat it as an abstract light show but only some 90 seconds of material was used, e.g. a protective-suited figure behind corrugated glass. In the autumn of 1975 a researcher found a further four sequences, which had been discarded.

The city of 'Everytown' in the film is based on London: a facsimile of St Paul's Cathedral can be seen in the background. The film, written throughout 1934, is notable for predicting World War II, being only 16 months off by having it start on Christmas 1940, rather than 1 September 1939. Its graphic depiction of strategic bombing in the scenes in which Everytown is flattened by air attack and society collapses into barbarism, echo pre-war concerns about the threat of 'the bomber will always get through'. Wells was an air power prophet of sorts, having described aerial warfare in Anticipations (1901) and The War in the Air (1908)."










Steve's Snacks Of The Week:





Coffee


Pills


Chipins Popcorn Chips


More Coffee


Yet Even More Coffee


Random Potato Chip Shards


Apple Slices







... AND NOW, Steve and this blog are both PROUD to once again present today's super special Church-less Movie of the Week in its entirety FOR FREE! Because I fucking rock is why.



But lets go over a few theater rules first. Firstly, there's absolutely no talking allowed in Steve's Theater during our feature and any and talkers WILL be given a dirty sanchez. Seriously!



Also, no cell phones or African-American berries in the theater. No open flames. Gays are accepted, however. Dispose of all trash in its proper receptacle. And please, absolutely NO TEXTING! Very serious about that one.



And be sure to dim your headlights (where applicable).





ENJOY THE SHOW, Y'ALL!




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